Visiting Vineyards in Erie County and Evaluating Future Winter Injury Management Strategies

By: Michela Centinari

Denise Gardner, Penn State Enology Extension Associate, and I visited the Lake Erie region, Northwest of Pennsylvania, on June 25 and 26, 2015. We first visited the Lake Erie Regional Grape Research and Extension center (LERGREC) and later met with wine grape growers and winemakers at the South Shore Wine Company.  The second day I visited three vineyards with our hosts Andy Muza, the horticulture Extension agent in Erie County, Bryan Hed and Jody Timer, research technologists at Penn State that focus on plant pathology and entomology, respectively.

Regional visits are always a great opportunity to connect with growers and winemakers, discuss production issues, gather information on topics of interest for future educational workshops, and also to learn about grower/winery relationships.

Figure 1. View of vineyards in North East, Pennsylvania.

Figure 1. View of vineyards in North East, Pennsylvania.

The wine industry in the Northwest region of Pennsylvania is growing, both in size and reputation.  Most of the growers I met are experienced juice grape growers transitioning to wine grapes. One of the growers pointed out that he chose, among his 200 acres of existing Concord vineyards, the very best location to plant and grow his Vitis vinifera wine grapes. He had a clear understanding of how site selection is critical to successful cultivation of V. vinifera varieties, and site selection is one of the key areas we discuss with growers upon entering the wine grape industry.

During the two-day visit, most of the discussion focused on winter injury sustained by V. vinifera, inter-specific hybrids and also V. labrusca/native grapevines (mostly Niagara) over the past two winters.  The last two years provided record low temperatures in Erie area during the 2013-2014 and 2014-2015 winters, which have proved challenging for farmers (Figure 2).   Variation in cold hardiness among grape genotypes, the impact of a diversified crop, and vineyard management practices to reduce/minimize future winter injury losses were discussed to great length.

Figure 2. Daily maximum and minimum temperatures recorded at the Lake Erie Research and Extension center during the (a) 2013-2014 and (b) 2014-2015 dormant seasons.

Figure 2. Daily maximum and minimum temperatures recorded at the Lake Erie Research and Extension center during the (a) 2013-2014 and (b) 2014-2015 dormant seasons.

Growers have been busy assessing the extent of winter injury, training suckers to be used as new trunks and cordons (Figure 3) and making re-planting decisions. One industry member pointed out that winter injury losses have forced growers to make strategic decisions in terms of variety selection. It was recommended that growers use this opportunity to substitute varieties that did not produce well with others that are more suited for the region and individual vineyard sites.  In terms of crop diversification, the use of cold-hardy hybrid varieties released by the University of Minnesota may be a viable option for growers, but wineries should be consulted with regards to their interest in those varieties.  Local market opportunities still need to be explored in Pennsylvania with regards to cold-hardy hybrid variety sales in the tasting room.

Figure 3. Riesling vines. The grower has retained all the suckers the vines produced. Two suckers per vine will be trained to be new trunks and cordons.

Figure 3. Riesling vines. The grower has retained all the suckers the vines produced. Two suckers per vine will be trained to be new trunks and cordons.

From a research prospective, these two consecutive severe cold winters provided a good opportunity to evaluate the cold hardiness of V. vinifera and inter-specific hybrid wine grape varieties at the variety evaluation planting established at LERGREC in 2008, as part of the NE-1020 multistate project. For more information about the NE-1020 trial, please refer to the article “NE-1020… What? The Top 5 industry benefits affiliated with the NE-1020 variety trial”  by Denise Gardner.

During our visit we noticed, as expected, further damage to the cold tender V. vinifera varieties. Among the V. vinifera, Grüner Veltliner and Cabernet Franc are recovering better than Pinot Grigio and Pinot Noir, which are either dead to the ground or showing a weak recovery (Figure 4a, b). Very good bud survival was observed in Chancellor (Figure 4c) which produced about 3-4 clusters per shoot despite the extremely cold events recorded over the last two winters. Overall, Marquette, a cold-hardy hybrid variety released by the University of Minnesota, has shown encouraging results. In addition to the cold sensitive V. vinifera varieties, a poor survival was observed in the NY81.0315.17 (Riesling x Cayuga White) selection (NE-1020 vineyard) and in Traminette at several vineyards within the Erie region (Figure 4d).

Figure 4. Grüner Veltliner, Pinot Grigio (a), Cabernet Franc (b) and Chancellor vines (c) at the variety evaluation planting established at LERGREC. Traminette and Vignoles vines at a commercial vineyard located in the Lake Erie region.

Figure 4. Grüner Veltliner, Pinot Grigio (a), Cabernet Franc (b) and Chancellor vines (c) at the variety evaluation planting established at LERGREC. Traminette and Vignoles vines at a commercial vineyard located in the Lake Erie region.

Protecting vines and fruiting potential from winter injury

Growers had several questions about best practices to protect trunks and the fruiting potential of the vines against winter injury.

Hilling up the soil around the vines in the fall and taking out hills in the spring is the most common practice used by growers to protect the graft union and some of the scion tissues above the graft union against low winter temperatures. A few growers showed concerns about the wet conditions of the soil in the fall/spring which makes this operation difficult. Heavy, wet soil may be thrown up under the trellis in large clods which can result in imperfect burial of the vine trunk, and makes the take-out operation difficult [1].  Other growers mentioned using straw, or hay, or plowing snow (if there is sufficient snowfall) around the vines to insulate vine tissues.  In the spring, it is critical to remove the soil around the graft union to avoid scion rooting, which defeats the purpose of rootstock and may result in vine decline [1].

Burying sucker canes under the soil or straw in the fall is a method that can be used to avoid winter injury and insure the retention of a ‘marketable’ crop the following year. A comprehensive description of the ‘burial cane’ technique can be found in: Winter Injury to Grapevines and Methods of Protection, Extension bulletin available for $15.  Growers in Ontario and in New York State used this technique to protect some fruiting potential of the vines.  As a brief explanation, shoots are grown on wires near the ground during the growing season and they are covered with soil or straw in the fall (Figure 5). Another option is to place canes near the ground after the vines go dormant.  “A wire on the ground that is tensioned either permanently or temporarily is very helpful to hold canes near the ground” [1].  The buried canes need to be extracted from the soil as soon as the risk of low winter temperatures is past.

Figure 5. Canes tucked around (a) a plastic bailing twine or (b) a wire. Canes are covered with straw before the winter. Photos credit: Sigel G., Winter Injury to Grapevines and Methods of Protection.

Figure 5. Canes tucked around (a) a plastic bailing twine or (b) a wire. Canes are covered with straw before the winter. Photos credit: Sigel G., Winter Injury to Grapevines and Methods of Protection.

The cane burial technique and its effects on vine bud survival and production have been examined at Cornell University with the help of cooperating growers of V. vinifera varieties. For detailed information on the study please check Understanding and Preventing Freeze Damage in Vineyards: Workshop Proceedings (21-38) [2].

The main finding in this study was:

  • Sucker canes buried in the fall do avoid the freeze injury suffered by the aerial canes of the vines.

However:

  • After canes were unburied, buds appeared to suffer injury unrelated to freezing. Buried canes showed more “blind nodes,” they were less productive (e., significantly fewer clusters) than canes not buried. Buried canes also showed a delayed bud and shoot emergence compared to aerial, not buried canes.
  • Cane burial is not a cheap operation: “typical extra costs per acre for cane burial in the Finger Lakes Region is about $400 to $500. This includes labor needs for laying out ground wire, wrapping them with suckers, hilling, and buried cane extraction, pruning, and tying in spring” [2].

In conclusion:

  • “In normal or warm years, burying cane can result in production and economic losses. However, in extremely cold winters, buried canes allow a “half crop” and no dead vines” [2].

References Cited

  1. Zabadal, TJ, Dami, IE, Goiffinet, MC, Martinson, TE, and Chien, ML (2007) Winter Injury to Grapevines and Methods of Protection. Extension Bulletin E2930. Michigan University Extension.
  2. Goffinet, MC (2007). Grapevine Cold Injury and Recovery After Tissue Damage and

Using Cane Burial to Avoid Winter Injury. In: Understanding and Preventing Freeze Damage in Vineyards, Workshop Proceedings. University of Missouri Extension. 21-38.

 

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