An American (Wine Marketer) in Paris

By Dr. Kathy Kelley

I have been fortunate over the past few years to co-lead groups of Penn State undergraduates on a two-week experience in Paris, France, with the goal of comparing U.S. and French agriculture and food systems.  The students learn about U.S. systems from Penn State experts during the spring semester and then they learn about the French systems when abroad in mid-May.   Grape and wine production happens to be one of the topics they study, and they get an opportunity to not only visit a vineyard and winery in Pennsylvania but a couple of operations in the Champagne region.  On my time off I visit wine shops and look for wine-related “things” that may be of interest to you, our blog readers.  What follows is a bit of what I have seen so far on my trip.

Learning about Wine in High School

One of the stops we took the Penn State students to in the Champagne region was an agricultural high school (Lycée Agroviticole – Crézancy; http://bit.ly/2qyL40l).  The school was founded in 1870 and is just one of several schools that teach students about farm management.   Some of the students who have an interest in becoming winemakers, along with high school graduates who seek viticulture and enology training, are responsible for the vineyards and grow the three main wine grapes used to make Champagne (Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, and Pinot Meunier). Screenshot 2017-05-19 16.23.55

In addition to learning about grape production, the students also learn the multi-step process of making Champagne and are involved in all steps of the process.

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Screenshot 2017-05-25 08.40.05Under the direction of a cellar master, the students’ final product is labeled and available for purchase.  Selections, with the price in U.S. dollars, include Brut Tradition ($15.00), Brut Blanc de Blanc ($16.30), Brut Rose ($16.75), Demi-Sec Tradition ($15.73), and Euphrasie Millesime 2008 ($21.35) (http://bit.ly/2rljEMQ). A product that is now available, but was not in 2015 when I last visited with a group, is Brut Terroir – their organic option ($19.11).

Champagne can be purchased online as well as from the cellar at the school.  A building is currently being converted into a retail space that the students will operate.  Students interested in Champagne production also attend conferences, participate in judging events, and co-host events for the industry.

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A 20,000 Euro ($22,474.74) Bottle of Wine

I am drawn to retail establishments and really enjoy observing how products are displayed, how the space is used, and the overall “feel” of the store.  While Paris has many wine shops and places to buy wine (even a wine shop where no French wine is sold/served (http://soifdailleurs.com), I enjoy visiting La Cava at the Lafayette Gourmet near the Opera Garnier in the 9th Arrondissement (http://bit.ly/2rkwriQ) because it is in the midst of a supermarket in the basement of a department store and it is staged as if it were a museum.  It is roomy, security guards are staged at the entrances, and the lighting highlights certain pieces (wines).

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There are approximately 2,500 labels, of which almost half are from Bordeaux.  Each time I visit I look for the most expensive wine available for purchase.  Though I found a few bottles that were priced over 2,000 euro (approx. $2,250 U.S.), I also found a few 750 mL bottles that were just a bit more: a 1945 Chateau Latour (Bordeaux), which Parker awarded a 90/100 and Wine Spectator a 100/100 (http://bit.ly/2rTOKs6), that sells for 12,900 euros (approx. $14,500 U.S.) and an 1899 Chateau d’Yquem (Bordeaux) for 20,000 euros (approx. $22,500), which Wine Spectator awarded a 91/100 (http://bit.ly/2qjseYs).   However, if those prices seem a little steep, do not forget that you can request a VAT tax refund when you leave the country, which for the Chateau d’Yquem is 2,400 euros (approx. $26,900 U.S.).

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Lavinia

Another shop that I visit when in Paris is Lavinia (located in the 1st Arrondissement, http://bit.ly/2qnVah7).  The business was established in 1999, has over 6,500 labels (including selections from the U.S.), and is often referred to as the Europe’s largest wine store.

Screenshot 2017-05-25 17.27.37

“La Cave” is in the basement level and houses rare and expensive wines.  In order to access the wines in this section, you will need to ask a staff member to open the door with a code, after which they will accompany you while you make your selection, and then they will bring the bottle to the cashier.  This is the one section of the store where it is forbidden to take photos of the bottles in an effort to minimize any exposure to excessive light from a camera’s flash.

After walking around both floors you may be interested in having a meal in the restaurant.  If you are interested in learning what wines pair with items on the menu you need only look at the display outside the dining room, find the particular food item (e.g., salad, cheese, a specific entrée), and refer to what wines are positioned in the column under the photo.  If you would like to taste a particular wine, ask for a card (deposit of 3 euros), load 10 euros or more onto the card, and insert it into one of four machines that will dispense a select number of reds, rose, or white wines, all for 1.10 euro to 9.60 euro per 3 cl (1 fluid ounce).

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As you can imagine with a city the size of Paris – the number of options for getting a glass or bottle of wine is immense.  If Paris is on your list of places to see, or if it is time for you to visit again, be sure to investigate what bars, restaurants, shops, and tastings you would like to experience.  While many establishments are well known and marked there are also a number of speakeasies in the city that deserve a visit, one of which is Lavomatic (https://www.lavomatic.paris).

Lavomatic is a working laundry mat with a secret door hidden behind one of the dryers.  After you push the “start” button on the dryer and pull the door to open it- you will find a dark staircase that leads up to a small bar with a few small seating areas including a few swings that hang from the ceiling.

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Until next time…

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